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.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments based on intelligence any more than that. megyn: conor powell covering syria life from our mideast bureau tod
the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place for assad to go. secretary of state hillary clinton has a just-added meeting today in dublin, ireland. here you see her earlier today. she and the russian minister decided to meet with the envoy to syria. across barbra himybill: russia s discussion in moscow. earlier in a week there was a report it was pulling support away from damascus. has that bent case? and why the relationship with russia so critical. >> reporter: it's one of the countries syria will listen to. russia could have sway over syrian president assad. >> the best issue
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
there is troubling news on the civil war that is raging some 21 months now in syria. the international envoy trying to help end the violence there says that he's still worried there's been no progress in the ending of the bloodshed that's claimed thousands of lives. hi, everybody, i'm jaime colby, today i'm in nor jenna lee. >> reporter: i'm kelly wright in nor jon scott. the u.n. envoy meeting face to nice with the syrian president today. while their account of that meeting was lens hopeful we are hearing now even more troubling reports the syrian army may have used a deadly poisonous gas on their own citizens. leland vittert lived from bethlehem in the west bank with more details. good day to you. >> reporter: good day. it's a little bit tear lee to figure out what may or may not have happened in terms of a report of a possible chemical weapons attack. right now we are seeing no serious split along religious lines inside that country. you can see it from the latest video. an air strike on what the rebels claim was a bakery line. when you look at this video it shows a lot of armed men in camoufla
escalation in syria's civil war. nato has detected the firing of unguided scud-type missiles. >>> and we're also learning new details of the latest phone call between president obama and house speaker john boehner did not go well. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's long-range rocket launch that's managed to put a satellite in earth's orbit. here's why it is important to all of us. even though north korea is one of the poorest countries and many people are starving there, the korean peninsula is the most tense, most dangerous places on earth. there are roughly one million north korean troops on it is side of the militarize zone separating from south korea. as well as nearly 30,000 u.s. forces. not only are they within strikes distance of the launch site, a long-range rocket shows north korea is on its way to developing technology to launch a rocket at the united states's west coast and hawaii. officials tell cnn that the working assumption is that the north koreans got outside help from others, including iran. so today's launch is raising some huge
with the growing threat from the neighboring syria. 400 troops will join nato forces and stand ready to act if syria intends to unleash chemical weapons. fox's leland vittert is in our middle east bureau. leland, just a few days ago the head of nato said the assad regime is about to collapse. why deploy these troops now? >> reporter: it really has to do with showing solidarity with the turks who are clearly very scared and timing comes a couple days after we learned that the syrians were mixing chemical weapons to possibly use. so this is the united states and nato's way of really get being behind turkey, a close ally saying we support you. the secretary of defense was quick to point out that the patriot missiles are just that, defensive weapons that will be put down along the syrian border to protect syria, protect turkey from attacks by syrian jets or scud missiles that would fly in but that is not exactly the whole story. the patriots could be easily programmed and put in a no-fly zone over northern syria. so far turkey is denying that as is nato saying this is purely defensive move by t
: there is terrible new violence to tell you about in the civil war in in syria. government jets hitting a town near the turkish border bombing a syrian security building captured by the rebels. reports of at least one person killed, 20 others wounded, this as the united states issues new warnings to syria about its chemical weapons. conor powell live in our middle east bureau in jerusalem right now. connor. >> reporter: jon, in recent days u.s. intelligence officials have issued warnings that it appears the syrian government is preparing its biological and chemical weapons. today secretary of state hillary clinton was in the czech republican today and she said if syria uses biological or chemical weapons that that would be quote a red line and the united states is prepared to take action if syria uses those weapons. well, and as this is all happening there appears to be some shifting in syria. in the past few days we've seen heavy, heavy fighting around damascus as rebels begin pushing in that area. there is cause to think the syrian government is losing its grip on damascus, that may be part of th
deadly plan. >>> as a deadly bloody civil war rages in syria, the opposition gets new support from around the wormed and the united states. what president obama just said. and a look how this crisis figures in the foreign policy challenges mr. obama faces in his section term. that is -- second term. that is next. [shouting] having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. jon: right now some new information on crime stories we're keeping an eye on. police say the man who confessed to murdering an alaska barista also planned to kill her boyfriend. before israel keyes committed suicide in jail he told investigators he new samantha koenig's boyfriend was coming to pick her up from work but he later changed his mind about killing him. police say keyes also confessed to seven other murders across the country but they don't yet know the i.d.'s of his victims. >>> 7-year-old austin sigg is retu
. >> reporter: but kerrie is not totally in sync with obama, and he has had limited intervention in syria, something the froms has resisted. kerry has built deep relationships with many foreign leaders? there are very few people in our country with greater experience over a longer period of time in foreign policy than senator kerry. >> i want to bring in jessica yellin live from the white house. i covered kerr ney 2004 when he was running for president and he was successfully caricatured as someone who was out of touch. give us a behind-the-scenes look at who he is and how he relates to people. >> reporter: well, senator kerry is a statesman, a man who has been working in washington for so many years that it is easy to paint a caricature of him that way. he is a man who has developed a relationship with president obama which is what's meaningful today and here at the white hou house. he is, as kate pointed out, was dispatched by the president not just two times or a number of times during foreign sort of mini crises, but very, very delicate situations and he has successfully eased the way
of syria eventually. so we have to be very careful. be part of the settlement, with a gap between what people think about the settlement out of court and the jury-ish community and about the reality. maybe you can tell me, do you know what is the actual percentage of settlement of jewish homes occupying land in judea and samaria? sound settlement, what is actual on the ground that she had occupied the lands? anyone? >> is 3%. i wish it was 50, 90 or 100%. but it's not the case. it is vacant. the idea that the jews cannot leave, because we do not have peace i do not accept it. to date israel with arab israelis, 20% in the week. they live like i live, vote like i vote and nobody tell them if you've not lived there, you have to move out. we have to get to the understanding that it's not about the settlement. it's much deeper than that. [inaudible] >> that is the question? i am 41, ma'am. i do not -- and said what you want. did you get peace? what did it get? [inaudible] >> i think my point is very clear that history has told us we cannot wait and we cannot get to a point when people speak
this morning. it's a big development in the fight against syria and a new level of u.s. involvement. we just learned within the past few hours the defense secretary leon panetta signed an order sending two patriot missile batteries to turkey. that's to assist that nation in defending against any pollible military action by syria. this move was expected as the civil war in syria destabilizes the assad regime with each passing day. in addition to this, 400 u.s. troops are going to turkey. they will be deployed to operate the missile batteries. cnn's nick payton walsh has the development. >> reporter: good morning. 400 personnel will be accompanying the batteries. let me give you history. over the past two months, we saw sporadic exchanges of fire across the border. syrian military firing into turkey causing often destruction and death. turkey often responding. that brought about this request to nato for patriot missile batteries. they're supposed to be there. this particular type better at taking out missiles in the sky rather than taking down aircraft. but this move part of a nato response. a
issued a new appeal for $1.5 billion to aid those displaced by the fighting since syria. the u.n. says critical assistance is dated for those inside syria as well as the refugees who fled to jordan, iraq, lebanon, turkey and the to. >> the violence in syria is raging across the country and there are really no more safe areas where people can fully and find safety as most parts of the country have now become engulfed in violence, including in damascus. >> the combination of prolonged violence, the scale and scope of destruction, the winter that is already here has just intensified the urgency to scallop response. >> the u.n. says its latest appeal for syria marks its largest short-term humanitarian appeal ever. the u.n. now warns the number of syrian refugees will likely double to more than 1 million in the next six months. the obama administration has blocked a u.n. security council resolution condemning israel's latest expansion of settlements in the occupied west bank. israel has announced the construction of thousands of new settlement homes following last month's historic recogniti
's going on right now. syria is running out of friends. the government of assad two years deep into war with its own people never had many allies to begin with. today russia's support of syria is cracking. for the first time a senior russian official has says publicly syria could likely fall to the rebels. the deputy foreign minister in moscow said we need to look at the facts in the eye. we can't exclude a victory by the opposition. the russians have blocked all u.n. security council resolutions aimed at stopping the civil war in syria. they have vetoed sanctions against the assad regime and provided weapons to government troops fighting the rebels. now their most powerful ally says assad might be losing. they're not alone. head of nato today said this. irng the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. i think now it is only a question of time. but those people, they're the politicians, want to see the real side of syria's civil war, the streets where people are caught up in the crossfire dying there. what you're about to say you can only see here on cnn. this is a teenager risking
to the media. >>> syria's ruthless regime may have little time left. president assad is losing his country's bloody civil war and now the foreign ministry denies that statement this morning. the rebels are outside the capital and gaining ground, but many groups with competing interests among the ranks and assad's fall would not mean an end to the fighting. >> don't really have a good sense. to the extent that external organizations are in there in some extremist form, the worry is the retribution afterwards and access to chemical weapons. >> this week, the u.s., europe and allies recognized the opposition, which could speed up international aid. but some factions of the rebels are known to have ties to al qaeda. that is the lingering question, you knock out the leader, but what is left, building a new country sometimes is the more difficult part compared to getting rid of the dictator. look at egypt and the mess they're going through. >> but the state department is encouraging russia to withdraw their support and join with the u.s. in implementing a political transition. that has not happe
to ban autonomous weapons outright. bonnie points to syria and wonders what killer robots could do in a conflict like that. >> because the weapons are emotionless, they could serve as a perfect tool for a dictator who would not have to worry about the danger of a human soldier turning on him if ordered to fire on his own civilians. a robot would not do that. >> reporter: when you're talking about a weapon that doesn't have the capacity to feel any compassion for its victims, it opens up all kinds of ethical questions that the pentagon and really militaries around the world are going to have to grapple with over the next 20 years. chris lawrence, cnn, the pentagon. >>> and we want to show you some live pictures now of abbas returning home to the west bank of his successful bid to make palestine a non-member observer state to the u.n. once again, these are live pictures here just in to cnn. >>> well, he filled up four entire passports and never got on a single flight. yes, can you believe that? we'll tell you how this globe trekker made his way to every country on earth and set a wor
, friends of syria group in morocco right now. they say recognition is fine, but we want weapons and more money. right now they're not getting it from the west. >> the u.s. is not give them either one of those things. do they completely sever ties with assad? how does that relationship change, if at all? >> that relationship has been essentially marabund for the last several months. there mab no ambassador there are and they're sanctions impose on the regime and there's no polical relationship with the regime of al assad with the united states. it doesn't change anything on that level. that means we're inching closer and closer to this government in exile, if you will, as being recognized by france, the uk, turkey, gulf cooperation council countries and now the united states. >> this is going to complicate things, because now at the same time we have this state department saying that a small portion of the rebels are terrorists. they are al qaeda. how does that complicate the situation? the u.s. is trying to support the rebels. the president says this is a legitimate organization, the gov
is making plans to evacuate thousands of russian citizens from syria. the fallout of assad would also be a huge blow to his other allies, iran and the terror group hezbollah. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt live in our new york city newsroom now. jonathan, this change of tone from the hutions seems to be very significant. >> yeah it, certainly is. because russia remember has been president bashar assad's greatest ally and protecter. if they are changing their tone now, accepting that the rebels are getting closer and closer to assad's power center in damascus through the violence that we have seen intensifying over the last couple of weeks, it signifies that the russians are realizing that their greatest friend in the middle east is about to be out of power and they better pretty quickly start making some new friends among the rebel opposition. officials say they are simply pleased to see the russians finally facing up to reality, listen. >> we agree that assad will not be a part of syrians future. we have noted as the media has the progress that the opposition has been
in the middle east if you look at syria where the u.s. is at risk for being drawn into a serious conflict there, and weapons, there's obviously talk about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done? >> well, i would go back to the presidency strategy on this, and take a look at it. didn't say that we would only, we reject everything we have in the military, across our government into the asia pacific. and prioritize the asia-pacific but also talked about the enduring requirement for us to be present and any security role in the middle east as well. so, you know, we're talking about i think a near-term perspective on this. you know, we see a kaleidoscope in afghanistan. yes, the middle east has issues and has historically had issues that will require i think u.s., obviously he was leadership and also will require certain level of military security overtime. and we will have to balance that as we look at the size and nature of our force structure. and what we have, the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced that we can do both in the long run. and i'm convi
supported limited military intervention in syria, something the president has resisted. over his 30-year career, kerry has built deep relationships with many foreign leaders. >> there are very few people in our country with greater experience over a longer period of time in foreign policy than senator kerry. >> reporter: perhaps kerry's biggest challenge to date is not his confirmation hearings on capitol hill, but rather following in hillary clinton's footsteps who has become one of the most popular officials in the obama cabinet, both here and abroad. katebolduan, cnn, washington. >>> up next hour, we'll talk to wolf blitzer about the multiple names being floated as kerry's replacement in the u.s. senate, including actor and humanitarian ben affleck. >>> calls and e-mails to the hot line of autism speaks have gone up 130% since last week's shooting in newtown. coming up next, we'll talk to dr. sanjay gupta who will join me in studio to explain asperger's and address, apparently, all the questions that are out there now. oh, let me guess --ou see this? more washington gridlock. no, it's
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)